Delicious Orange Curd

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Creamy Orange Cardamom Curd

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Orange Curd
Smooth, creamy and sweet, orange curd is a lovely alternative to the classic lemon. Enjoy it on scones with a spot of tea (hint: Earl Grey pairs perfectly.)
(recipe via Simple Bites)
#Recipe #save & #share 😀
→ pssssst…..
(Oh & btw → 1 – 2 drops of 100% Pure Orange Essential Oil) 😀
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It’s all apples & oranges?
😉
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OH I’M EXCITED FOR THIS ONE!
I’m just mad about Lemon Curd so imagine the flavor of this! Oh my!

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YUMMO!

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It’s raining oranges here in Arizona in the winter, so I’m trying to hang on to those flavors for dear life ♥

“If you’ve never had homemade citrus curd, it is paradise in a jar. Creamy, sweet and just a bit tangy, it’s a dream stirred into Greek yogurt or heaped atop a freshly baked scone.”

Make sure to read the instructions clearly before starting to cook your curd. Once you begin, it comes together quickly, so you’ll want to have all your tools and ingredients ready.

Ingredients
2 large navel oranges, zested and juiced.
1-1/4 cups sugar
1 teaspoon ground cardamom
4 egg yolks
2 eggs
6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into cubes

Instructions
Set up a double boiler (I use a saucepan and a stainless steel mixing bowl), add 2 inches of water to the bottom pan and bring to a simmer.
In a small bowl, stir together the orange zest, sugar and cardamom.Remove the top half of the double boiler and let it cool briefly. Once it has returned to room temperature, add the egg yolks and whole eggs and whisk them together. When they are well beaten, add the sugar mixture and orange juice. Stir to combine.Place the top of the double boiler on the steaming bottom pan and add the butter.Switch to a rubber or silicone spatula and stir continually as the orange curd begins to cook.Using an immersion thermometer, monitor the temperature of the curd while you stir. As it approaches 190 – 200°F, it should start to thicken. One sign of doneness is that it will coat the back of your spoon without running or dripping. If it is slow to thicken but is approaching 210°F, remove the top portion of the double boiler and let it cool for a moment before returning to the heat for an additional minute or two of cooking. It typically takes 6 to 9 minutes for a curd to cook through.
When the curd has thickened to the consistency of sour cream, it is done. Remove the top half of the double boiler and stir off the heat. During this time, it will continue to thicken a bit.
Strain the curd through a fine mesh sieve into a bowl. The straining removes both the zest (which will have imparted a great deal of flavor to the curd during cooking time) and any bits of scrambled egg.
Pour the strained curd into jars for storage. When it has cooled to room temperature, store in refrigerator.
If you plan to freeze your curd, make sure to leave plenty of headspace, so that when it expands, it doesn’t cause breakage.

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by Katie Goodman, author of GoodLife Eats Etc.
“There are so many fun ways to enjoy citrus curd that I’m sure you’ll find yourself making it often. Here are a few of my favorite ways to enjoy it, plus some links for recipe inspiration. You can allow the citrusy goodness to take center stage, or be a background flavor for just a hint of flavor.”

with your breakfast

On Steel Cut Oatmeal
Pancake or Waffle Topping
Swirled into Yogurt
Spread on Toast
On top of Scones
Inside Donuts (or easy crescents) 😀

with dessert

Drizzled on Fruit and Whipped Cream
As Macaron Filling
Between Cake Layers
Inside Crepes
In a Tart Shell
Serve with Panna Cotta
As a Cupcake Filling
With Ice Cream
Marbled with Cheesecake
On Pavlova

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OMG…I am officially now a member of “I eat this with a spoon” club!

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💛 💙 💜 💚 ❤ 💗 💓 💕 💖 💞 💘

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