Green Sauce No. 4

Green Sauce No. 4

– via Bon Appétit

 

 Mixing lemon and lime juice, as well as a shot of apple cider vinegar, makes for a much more dynamic dressing than just one type of acid could ever achieve.

Ingredients:

MAKES ABOUT 1 CUP

  • 3 tablespoons white miso
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 teaspoons tahini
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon honey, preferably raw
  • 2 cups cilantro leaves with tender stems
  • ⅓ cup sliced chives
  • 1½ teaspoons grated peeled ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

Preparation:

 Pulse miso, lemon juice, lime juice, oil, tahini, vinegar, and honey in a food processor or a blender until miso is dissolved and mixture is smooth. Add cilantro, chives, ginger, and coriander and pulse until herbs are finely chopped; season with salt and pepper.

Do Ahead: Sauce can be made 3 days ahead. Cover and chill.

Recipe by Alaina Sullivan
Photograph by Alaina Sullivan

I posted both versions (same just drafted differently), Bon Appétit’s AND the original source; because I like how BA goes straight to point with recipe AND the OS’s words about it. ENJOY!

The Greenest Green Sauce That Goes on Everything

– via Bon Appétit

BY ALAINA SULLIVAN APRIL 19, 2017

If there’s one thing I do to make my life easier during the week, it’s make a sauce. I fix a small jar’s worth, stick it in the fridge, and rest easy knowing that I’ve got a dependable, phone-a-friend lifeline for after-work meals. A sauce breathes life into humble rice and perks up roasted vegetables. It complements rich meats, makes salads sing, and completes a grain bowl in one swoosh.

There are a million ways to make an herb sauce; this is the version I’ve got on speed dial right now. It’s basically a combination of the ingredients I reach for most often (miso, tahini, honey) blended together with herbs into a single condiment. The result is tangy, vibrant—I may go as far as to say it’s addictive. The flavor is complex, but the process isn’t. If you have 15 minutes and a food processor, you’re there. And it’s very forgiving. I only roughly measure, and I’d urge you to play around and make it your own.

Begin by washing some herbs: a small bunch of cilantro and/or parsley and a small bundle of chives. Don’t sweat exact amounts. Trim away the tough part of the stems and then toss the herbs right into your food processor. Next, grate a knob of ginger (about a 1″ piece) and add that. Squeeze in the juice of 1 lemon and 1 lime, and add 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar. Add 3 Tbsp. miso (I like either sweet white or chickpea miso), 2 Tbsp. olive oil, 2 Tbsp. tahini, and 1 Tbsp. raw honey.

I grind up some coriander seeds and throw that into the mix. Pulse it together (to help control the consistency), and pour in a little water to thin it if needed; it should be pourable but not too runny. Season with salt and pepper, taste, add a little more of whatever it needs, and then put it on everything.

 

Fettuccine Alfredo

Fettuccine Alfredo

fettuccine-alfredo
– from Bon Appétit

Real alfredo should never (never!) include cream; the silky sauce is the result of an emulsion between the grated cheese, melted butter, and starchy pasta water. This is part of BA’s Best, a collection of our essential recipes.

Ingredients:

12 ounces fettuccine or other long pasta
Kosher salt
¼ cup (½ stick) unsalted butter
¾ cup finely grated Parmesan, plus more for serving
Freshly ground black pepper

Preparation:
Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until very al dente. Drain, reserving 2 cups pasta cooking liquid.
Transfer 1 cup pasta cooking liquid to a large skillet. Bring to a gentle simmer, then whisk in butter, a piece at a time, until melted. Whisking constantly, gradually add cheese, making sure it’s completely melted and incorporated before adding more. Add pasta and toss to coat, adding more pasta cooking liquid as needed, until sauce blankets noodles completely. Serve topped with pepper and more cheese.

Recipe by Carla Lalli Music
Photograph by Michael Graydon & Nikole Herriott

Braised Chicken Thighs with Squash and Mustard Greens

Braised Chicken Thighs with Squash and Mustard Greens

braised-chicken-thighs-with-squash-and-mustard-greens

Braised Chicken Thighs With Squash And Mustard Greens
Don’t have an acorn squash for this chicken thighs recipe? Use butternut. Not into mustard greens? Use kale, Swiss chard, or spinach.

Ingredients

  • 4 pounds skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs (about 12), patted dry
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 8 scallions, white and pale green parts sliced into 1-inch pieces, dark green parts thinly sliced
  • 4 dried chiles de árbol
  • 1 2-inch piece ginger, peeled, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • ½ cup low-sodium soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons dark brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
  • 2 cups low-sodium chicken broth, divided
  • 1 acorn squash, halved lengthwise, seeds removed, sliced ½ inch thick
  • 1 bunch mustard greens, tough stems removed, leaves torn
  • 2 tablespoons unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds
  • Cooked white rice (for serving)

Preparation

Lightly season chicken thighs all over with salt and pepper. Heat vegetable oil in a large Dutch oven or other heavy pot over medium-high. Working in 2 batches and pouring off all but 2 Tbsp. fat between batches, cook chicken, skin side down, until skin is browned and crisp, 8–10 minutes. Transfer to a plate, placing skin side up (chicken will not be cooked through at this point).

Cook white and pale green parts of scallions, chiles, and ginger in same pot, stirring often, until scallions and ginger are golden, about 3 minutes. Add wine, bring to a simmer, and cook until reduced to about 3 Tbsp., 5 minutes. Add soy sauce, brown sugar, sesame oil, and 1 cup broth and bring to a simmer, stirring to dissolve sugar. Return chicken to pot, placing skin side up and overlapping if needed. Partially cover pot, reduce heat, and simmer until chicken is cooked through, 25–30 minutes. Transfer chicken to a plate.

Add squash and remaining 1 cup broth to pot and push in squash so it’s mostly submerged. Arrange greens on top. Bring to a simmer, partially cover pot, and cook until squash is barely fork-tender and greens are wilted, 10–12 minutes. Uncover, increase heat to medium, and continue to cook until liquid is reduced by about two-thirds and has the consistency of thin gravy, 10–15 minutes.

Remove pot from heat and drizzle vinegar over vegetables. Taste sauce; it should be plenty salty, but season with more salt if needed. Add chicken back to pot, turning to coat in sauce, then scatter dark green parts of scallions and sesame seeds over top. Serve with rice.

Chicken can be braised 2 days ahead. Let cool; cover and chill. Reheat covered over low.

Recipe by Claire Saffitz
Photograph by Michael Graydon & Nikole Herriott

 

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Got a Can of White Beans? You’re Halfway to Dinner Tonight

Got a Can of White Beans? You’re Halfway to Dinner Tonight

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Another favorite dish from my favorite blog (at top of favorites  😉 w/ Kevin’s CLOSET COOKING being another) and that’s Bon Appétit 

sausage-white-bean-egg-skillet-mise-en-place

Welcome to Cooking Without Recipes, in which we teach you how to make a dish we love, but don’t worry too much about the nitty-gritty details of the recipe, so you can create your own spin. Every day this week, we’ll be bringing you a staffer’s favorite quick dinner—we’re talking under 15 minutes. Seriously. Today, integrated marketing associate Jordan Schaefer reaches for an old favorite.

With two small kids and a limited amount of time, I’m always open to new ways to get a healthy, fast dinner on the table. One afternoon, after overhearing a coworker tell her husband she was making sausage and white beans for dinner, I thought: That could work. Great Northern beans and sweet Italian sausage are grocery staples in our family, and with a few seasonal tweaks, this winning combo has become a year-round foundation for a quick, delicious dinner that’s ready in no time. Here’s how I do it:

sausage-white-bean-egg-skillet-mise-en-place
Alex Lau

Drain and rinse one can of white beans (we use Great Northern or cannellini). Remove two to three sweet Italian sausages from their casings and crumble into a nonstick skillet with some olive oil over medium-high heat, breaking up any large pieces with a fork. When sausage is almost cooked through, about five minutes, add beans and toss until warm. If the beans and sausage get dry, add a splash of white wine or chicken stock. Add a big handful of shredded kale until slightly wilted. Top with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, shaved Parmesan, a squeeze of lemon, and crushed red pepper flakes, if you crave some heat. I like to mix this up in the summer by skipping the kale and topping with fresh arugulaand cherry tomatoes dressed lightly with lemon and olive oil.

If you have a few extra minutes to spare, this is also delicious with a poached orfried egg.

More Cooking Without Recipes

Cranberry Chutney with Orange, Figs, and Mustard

RECIPES from my (one of my) FAVORITE food sources! Bon Appétit 
and OMG…the sides in this issue are to die for! I’m wanting to keep it simple and delicious. Then they go put THIS LIST OUT?! 103 EASY AWESOME SIDE RECIPES! 
Making it impossible to not choose MORE than one of them! This Cranberry Orange & fig Chutney is definitely on my list now! CHECK THEM OUT @ links in this post   

Cranberry Chutney with Orange, Figs, and Mustard

PUBLISHED: NOVEMBER 2016 via Bon Appétit ♡

Cranberry Chutney With Orange, Figs, And Mustard
If using frozen cranberries, which are just as good for this recipe, don’t bother thawing them first.

Ingredients

MAKES ABOUT 4 CUPS

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium shallot, finely chopped
  • 1 2-inch piece ginger, peeled, finely chopped
  • ¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 medium orange, unpeeled, seeds removed, chopped
  • 6 dried Turkish figs, chopped
  • 1¾ cups sugar
  • ½ cup sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons whole grain mustard
  • 1 10-ounce bag fresh or frozen cranberries
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

Preparation

Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium. Cook shallot and ginger, stirring occasionally, until shallot is translucent, about 3 minutes. Stir in cinnamon and cook, stirring often, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Mix in orange, figs, sugar, vinegar, mustard, and ½ cup water and bring to a simmer, stirring until sugar is dissolved. Add cranberries and increase heat to medium-high. Bring to a boil and cook, stirring occasionally, until cranberries burst and liquid is reduced to a light syrup, 12–18 minutes. Let cool slightly; season with salt and pepper.

Do Ahead: Chutney can be made 1 week ahead. Let cool; cover and chill.

Recipe by Claire Saffitz
Photograph by Alex Lau

Check these easy delicious side dishes!!! CLICK HERE 

 Here’s a peek at a Couple  /few 😀 YUMM! AND THE RECIPES ARE Even MORE DELICIOUS THAN THE IMAGES!
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People of the World: Buy Better Spices

SPICES!

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– From Bon Appétit 

People of the World: Buy Better Spices

As someone who accidentally added a tablespoon of nutmeg to a batch of mac & cheese instead of ¼ teaspoon, I truly appreciate the power of spices. The power to ruin. Or add mouth-numbing spice, or sure, beautiful depth of flavor and overall deliciousness. I’ve never thought much about them when I’m in the grocery store aisle, but that’s one of the most important factors when it comes to spice success. Are they fresh? Unadulterated? Flavorful? 100% what they claim to be? In The Spice Companion: A Guide to the World of Spices, out November, La Boite spice shop owner Lior Lev Sercarz goes deep into this spice world of ours. From A to Z, he documents 102 spices, their flavors, origin, harvest season, and starring recipes. There are guides on how to make your own spice blends, how to store them, and ready-to-go recipes for necessary blends, like mulled wine. I said necessary. In the excerpt below, Sercarz lays out the rules for shopping for spices, which we could all probably be doing better. Go easy on the nutmeg, though. —Alex Beggs


Most people know what to consider when buying a good wine or a vine-ripened tomato, but they rarely take into account the fact that spices should be purchased just as thoughtfully. There are maxims to consider when buying spices, things to look for in terms of quality, and ways to evaluate what you already have.

Find a source or a store that you trust, and start by buying small quantities to evaluate the quality. To determine quality, the immediate test is visual. Singular spices should have a uniform color. If you notice both dark and light particles or different shades, it could mean the spice was harvested before maturation, the selection wasn’t the best, or the sorting wasn’t done properly. If you buy black pepper and it’s gray—something is not right.

plum-tarts-with-honey-and-black-pepper

These plum tarts with black pepper are pure magic. But if your black pepper is old and gray, that would be a travesty. Photo: Christina Holmes

Christina Holmes

Spices should also have the most vibrant, intense color possible. If they look grayish or faded, that might be a tell that they have been sitting on the store’s shelf for way too long. Also, if you notice a lot of powder on the bottom of a package of whole spices, this can mean they are old and have started breaking down. This is especially true with dried herbs.

It is important to note that by the time you see a jar or bag of spices at the store, they are probably already five to seven months old. There is nothing wrong with them; that’s just the way spice production works, and the FDA just doesn’t require expiration dates on spices. I wish they did. Unlike some wines, spices do not become better with time.

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Heavy on the spice: BA’s best masala chai. Photo: Alex Lau

Alex Lau

Spices are not the kinds of things we need to be passing down to our children; they should be used, not saved. Unless you really think you are going to consume three pounds of cubeb in a matter of months, buy spices in small quantities and refresh your stock often.

After you bring home a new spice, open the packaging and evaluate the scent. Spices should smell—and the more intense the smell, the better. (Do note that not all spices will have a very pleasant scent, like asafetida, black cumin, and black cardamom.)

The next step is to taste the spice.Again, not all spices will taste good on their own, but if you know what to look for, you’ll know if you’ve found it. Some might be a bit bitter, hot, or sour, but this may be just right. The point is that spices should taste like something; otherwise, why add them to your dish?

Keep in mind that the flavor, taste, and smell will change a lot in contact with raw or cooked foods, or when infused into a liquid. The easiest way to evaluate the quality is to sprinkle some on whatever you’re cooking, though you don’t want to ruin a whole meal with an experiment gone wrong. Sometimes I test spices on popcorn, in a little broth, or on a small piece of chicken. Note what you smell and taste, and then rate the spice in some way so that if you buy it from another source, you can easily compare them. You will have to compare a few sources to become better at buying spices.

Unfortunately, most of us are not taught to evaluate them at all, not even in the world of professional chefs. But thanks to online and specialty stores, we now have convenient, regular access to a variety of spices, so you can buy small quantities to try from all over the world.

spice-companion-book

Reprinted from The Spice Companion. Copyright © 

Coronation Chicken spice

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Pomegranate is One of the Healthiest Fruits On Our Planet

Again…I LOVE POMEGRANATES!

Okay…yes, I’m really jumping the gun here! I can’t help it! Seeing the new fruits growing has me excited!

So…along with sharing this blogger’s  post (& blog) because it’s plants and planting and/or info about it, great find. 

Then along with posts from my favorite Bon Appetit…I’m just  getting ready…

 

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24 Citrus Recipes with Orange, Lemon, Lime, Grapefruit Slideshow Photos – Bon Appétit

http://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/slideshow/citrus-recipes

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21 Pomegranate Recipes – Bon Appétit

http://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/slideshow/pomegranate-salad-chicken-recipes

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They’re coming!!!!

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So new & young that it’s standing up straight,  making the picture look upside down. 

New shoots…

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Nice mornings, even though it’s still HOT. 

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My only fish until the temperatures go down!

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Grilled Citrus Chicken – Bon Appétit
http://note.taable.com/post/286AC/Grilled-Citrus-Chick/2b-T3553T098-51-0-540374808848-6

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.Yellow Salad with Citrus-Date Vinaigrette Recipe – Bon Appétit

http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/yellow-salad-with-citrus-date-vinaigrette

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.Release Your Seeds, Pomegranate! – Bon Appétit

http://www.bonappetit.com/test-kitchen/inside-our-kitchen/article/release-your-seeds-pomegranate
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Pomegranate Molasses Vinaigrette Recipe – Bon Appétit
http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/pomegranate-molasses-vinaigrette

Tjs Garden

The health promoting attributes of Pomegranates put it in the category of “SUPER FOODS”. Pomegranate contains potent and unrivaled antioxidants called punicalagin and punicalin.  The juice of the Pomegranate has greater antioxidant activity than acai juice, green tea, cranberry juice or red wine.

healthiest juice to drink Pomegranate Juice

Pomegranate is one of the earliest cultivated fruits throughout history.  It appears in Egyptian tombs, Greek mythology and even in the Bible.  Pomegranate is a symbol of abundance and faith in many cultures.  Recorded history shows that over 2000 years ago Pomegranate was used to treat an assortment of illnesses.

Inside the fruit are hundreds of tiny seeds called arils; this is what we eat or make into juice.  The aril is delicious with a sweet, tart flavor that is high in vitamin C.  Pomegranates originated in Iran and are commonplace throughout the Middle East.  The unique flavor and exceptional health benefits are making it increasingly…

View original post 287 more words

50 Easy Summer Weeknight Dinner Recipes So You Can Just Chillllllllllllll

Feast your eyes on these dishes, and it’s not all they’ve got over there, you’ll see why I had to share!

from Bon Appétit 

50 Easy Summer Weeknight Dinner Recipes So You Can Just Chillllllllllllll

JUNE 29, 2016 / WRITTEN BY ELYSSA GOLDBERG

Summer gives you permission to stop trying so hard. Resign yourself to drinking all day outside. Read for pleasure. And absolutely do not stress about preparing an elaborate dinner. These 50 relaxed dinner recipes, which require minimal effort and time, want very little from you—except maybe a sip of your ice-cold beer.

Another instance, way too many for me to blog, that I have to share!

And there’s SO MUCH MORE at their webpage! Just click on link.

Here’s a few samples  ➩ ➻ ➼

Charred and Raw Corn with Chile and Cheese
All the flavors of a Mexican grilled corn on the cob, now in a convenient, tossed-together form.

Mint and Cumin-Spiced Lamb Chops
With lamb rib chops, we insist you leave the fat on the bone.

Tomato and Cabbage Tabbouleh
A proper tabbouleh will be mainly vegetables and herbs, with just a smattering of bulgur threaded through.

Soy and Sesame Short Ribs
Takashi Inoue, of Takashi in New York City, loves to use this marinade on any cut of beef (hanger is another favorite), chicken wings, or pork ribs.

Moroccan Chicken Brochettes
Dark-meat chicken is the best for grilling: Unlike lean breasts, thighs have plenty of fat, so they won’t dry out.

Perfectly Steamed Lobster
Buy perky, energetic lobsters; they should be active and extend their claws upwards when lifted.

Grilled Flatiron Steak with Toasted Spice Vinaigrette

Let the steaks rest on top of the tomatoes. Their juices will commingle and make the dressing that much better

Spiced Lamb Burger
As the lamb cooks inside the pita, the fat will render into the bread, creating a crunchy, compact, vibrantly flavored meat pie that’s unlike any burger you’ve ever had.

Chilled Tomato and Stone Fruit Soup
This riff on gazpacho gets unexpected sweetness—and great color—from the addition of cherries and a peach.

Vietnamese Pork Chops
Go light on the salt when seasoning these chops; the marinade is fairly salt, especially after it reduces

Steak Tacos with Cilantro-Radish Salsa
Radishes make a crunchy salsa for these—or any other taco you’re serving this summer.

Grilled Bread with Ricotta and Tomatoes
Use very ripe—even overripe—tomatoes; they’ll give up even more juice.

Salt-and-Pepper Steak
What’s inexpensive, versatile, and crazy tasty? Skirt steak. It also cooks in a flash, which make it tailor-made for grilling.

Jerk Spice–Rubbed Chicken Legs
We took the traditional Jamaican jerk spice and…simplified it. Before you call the authenticity police, give it a try on roast chicken legs.

Grilled Greens and Cheese Quesadillas
Not to break your heart or anything, but good luck finding Toma, a cow’s-milk cheese. We didn’t just go rogue: Chef Cámara okayed the cheddar substitute.

Sambal Chicken Skewers
Kebabs get a bad rap. (Decades of alternating zucchini coins and cherry tomatoes can do that.) But this Asian take, with a spicy, sticky glaze, makes for a very convincing comeback.

Grilled Kielbasa Tacos
Make sure to cut the onions and peppers into big pieces so that they don’t fall through the grill grates.

Grilled Citrus Chicken
Ketchup and mustard have nothing on summer’s true soulmates: grilled chicken and all the bright citrus you can find

AND SO MUCH MORE!!!!

Including another awesome post on roasted veggies that are to die for. I won’t miss meat with those! Seriously. It’s on a link when you scroll down the page. I’ve got stuff to do or I’d post many of those also; they look simply delicious.!

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Grilled Salmon Skewers (or kabobs) …

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Farmers market quinoa dish….

 

 

Simple & Easy 4th of July weekend Dishes


Simple & Easy 4th of July weekend Dishes

No recipes…just straight forward all-American summer eating

Steak, corn on the cob & potato salad



Okay ..I guess I will throw in directions for one way to make a steak; the way I did this one. CAST IRON SKILLET LOVE!

And stove top corn on the cob

The Potato Salad is in my previous post.

Top Sirloin Steak

I know I said fresh. Well I froze it while fresh? #thawing

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Top sirloin steak has just the right marbling of fat to create a melt-in-your-mouth, crowd-pleasing flavor. These boneless cuts are usually very affordable, large enough to feed a family, and adaptable to a variety of cooking methods….
popular methods: pan-fried on the stove, grilled, broiled and roasted.

Select a cut of top sirloin from your local butcher or grocery store.
Fresh sirloin steak is deep red in color, with a generous marbling of fat. This marbling is what makes steak succulent.
There should be a band of white fat around the outside of the steak.

*Marinate the steak, if desired. Top sirloin steak is a great meat to marinate, since it pairs well with many flavors.
Choose your favorite marinade from the store, or mix up your own with equal parts oil, vinegar and spices.
Place the steak in a sealable plastic bag and add the marinade. Seal the bag and allow the steak to marinate for 4 hours or overnight.
When you’re ready to cook the steak, remove it from the bag, pat it dry with paper towels, and proceed to the next step.

Allow the steak to sit at room temperature for one hour before cooking. Cooking a cold steak will make it more difficult to achieve the “doneness” you desire. Room temperature steaks are easier to bring to rare, medium rare, medium well, and well done

Cut the steak into serving sized portions. *i did not do that on this occasion. Instead, I sliced it against the grain like I do with ranchero, flat iron or skirt steak, AFTER it was done and AFTER resting.

Season both sides liberally, a good steak doesn’t need more than salt & pepper. HOWEVER,  haha….I still go at it with my favorites. And it is delicious!

Place a cast iron skillet over medium high heat on the stove. Put a teaspoon or two of cooking oil in the pan and allow it to get smoking hot.

Place a cast iron skillet or a frying pan over medium high heat on the stove. Put a teaspoon or two of cooking oil in the pan and allow it to get smoking hot.

Place the steaks in the center of the pan. *i used one LARGE steak for 3 of us & it was perfect. Let them cook on one side for 15 seconds, then turn them to the other side using a pair of tongs. They should form a thick, crunchy crust on both sides.
Don’t turn the steaks until they’ve seared; moving them too soon will prevent the crust from forming.
Don’t crowd the steaks in the pan. If necessary, cook the steaks in more than one batch.

Continue cooking (I like adding butter, fresh herbs & basting remainder of cooking time/optional)
For rare steaks, cook for a total of 1 1/2 minutes on each side.
For medium rare steaks, cook for a total of 2 minutes on each side.
For medium well steaks, cook for a total of 2 1/2 minutes on each side.
For well done steaks, cook for 3 or more minutes on each side. (I’m not judging)

Remove the steaks from the pan and allow them to rest. This allows the juices to redistribute through the steak.

Serve the steak hot. Like you needed to be told that  or most of this?
Well…I thought about just posting the pics. But a beginner could cross my path here.

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We had corn on the cob (made old school) & potato salad with the steak.
Corn on the cob was shucked, cleaned, dropped in a large pot of boiling water.
It is a very easy technique and produces the most delicious corn on the cob. Corn should be cooked quickly and not left to sit in the boiling water very long. Fresh corn is at its best when it is very milky inside. If overcooked, it will dry out quickly.

 

When buying corn at the market, the husks (outer green covering) should be bright green and fit snugly around the ear of corn. The kernels should be in tight rows right to the tip of the ear of corn, and be plump and milky.

In the grocery store, it is perfectly acceptable (in my book) to peel back the outer green husk to check and see if the corn looks good.

Husking the corn:

For maximum freshness, husk the corn just before cooking. When ready to cook your corn on the cob, pull all the husks off of the corn and discard. Remove silk from the corn and discard.

How to boil and cook corn:

Choose a pot large enough to hold the amount of corn you want to cook, with room for water to cover the corn. Cover pot and bring cold unsalted water just to a boil on high heat. Some people like to add a little sugar (i did) to the boiling water, but never add salt as it will only toughen the corn.

Add husked corn ears and bring the water back to a boil on high heat (covered or not). Since corn tends to float on top of the water, I cover the pot. This helps the water come back to a boil faster and helps the corn cook. It will take approximately 3 to 4 minutes to bring the water back to a boil. Once water comes back to a boil, immediately remove the corn ears from the water. The corn is now cooked perfectly and NOT overcooked.
Boiling time is a matter of taste; some people like to just boil them a minute or two to warm their corn on the cob, leaving the kernels crisp and fresh. Others like to let them boil 3 to 10 minutes for softer kernels. How long you cook your corn on the cob depends on your tastes.

Remove the cooked corn ears from the hot water with tongs.

Serve with butter and salt (some like pepper).

If you’re having a party, borrow this trick from markets in Mexico. Vendors selling ears of corn for snacks keep them ready and waiting for several hours in tubs of lukewarm water. Instead of butter, ears are rubbed with lime wedges and sprinkled with salt.
I’ve tried it on the streets a couple different ways. Mostly (elote) mayonnaise or butter, cayenne powder, chile powder, crumbled cotija cheese, (Parmesan or ricotta salata), lime wedges
– Elote (Mexican Grilled Corn) – here’s a recipe from my favorite Bon Appétit 

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This recipe is great for serving family-style: Put all of the ingredients out separately and let your guests top the corn however they wish. Watch the step-by-step video here.

http://bonap.it/2duO4p5

The corn grills to perfection on the grill along side of the meat that you are cooking.   As soon as it comes off it gets slathered in a mayonnaise and sour cream cilantro mixture (Crema! *said with an accent)
Then it is topped with parmesan cheese and chili powder.  All of these flavors combined were incredible!
One of my very favorite street food vendor memories is of corn on the cob at the 4th Avenue Street Fair in Tucson, where they dipped the corn right into melted butter that they had in a coffee can. That sure stuck in my memory files!
Damn good is why!
So if you don’t have a butter crock or heat friendly vessel…try a coffee can, or any can deep enough to dip corn. ♡

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.even for the steak 😀

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Potato Salad on previous post ..

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Have a great weekend!

Grill Every Damn Day: 8 New Recipes to Make from Now Till Labor Day

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Grill Every Damn Day: 8 New Recipes to Make from Now Till Labor Day
courtesy of Bon Appétit

(Cute little #instagram #BonAppétit videos at end) ♡

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I had to share this one!
Too many recipes for me to copy & paste…so I will leave the link.. AGAIN
@BonAppétit

And some photos…of course 😀

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#CreativityIs what turns a good meal into a great one. Also, cannoli. 😁

A post shared by bonappetitmag (@bonappetitmag) on

 

 

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