How To Make Fresh Pasta from Scratch

How To Make Fresh Pasta from Scratch

~ COOKING LESSONS FROM THE KITCHN

 

Note ~ I don’t have a pasta machine so I roll with hand cut, pun intended 😉

In this guide, I’m walking you through every single step in detail, but in reality, fresh pasta comes together quite quickly. Mixing and kneading the dough takes about 10 minutes, then you let it rest for 30 minutes. You can use this resting time to pull together the ingredients for the pasta sauce. After resting, rolling out and cutting the dough takes maybe another 10 to 20 minutes, depending on how fast you go and how many helpers you have.

Speaking of helpers, it helps to have a few. You can definitely do it by yourself, but it’s really nice to have an extra set of hands, especially if you’re hand-cranking the dough through a counter-top pasta roller. Whether working by yourself or with someone else, I find that you fall into a rhythm of rolling the sheets of pasta, cutting the noodles, and sprinkling everything with flour.

Ready? Let’s make some pasta.

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Fresh Egg Pasta

From The Kitchn – via Emma Christensen
Makes enough for about 4 to 6 servings

What You Need

Ingredients
2 cups flour, plus extra for rolling the pasta
1/2 teaspoon salt
3 large eggs

Equipment
Mixing bowl
Fork or dough whisk
Pasta machine (see Additional Notes for rolling pasta by hand)
Baking sheet
Clean dishtowel

Instructions

1. Combine the Flour and Salt: Whisk together the flour and salt with a fork in a medium mixing bowl.

2. Add the Eggs: Create a deep well in the middle of the flour and crack the eggs into this well. Whisk the eggs with the fork to combine.

Note: You can do this on the counter-top “Italian Grandmother Style” if you prefer, but I find it’s easier and less messy to do it in a bowl. For food-processor instructions, see below.

3. Begin Combining the Flour and Eggs: As you whisk the eggs, begin gradually pulling in flour from the bottom and sides of the bowl. Don’t rush this step. At first, the eggs will start to look like a slurry. Once enough flour has been added, it will start forming a very soft dough. Don’t worry if you haven’t used all the flour.

4. Knead the Pasta Dough: Turn the dough and any excess flour out onto a clean counter. Begin gently folding the dough on itself, flattening, and folding again. It will be extremely soft at first, then gradually start to firm up. Once it’s firm enough to knead, begin kneading the dough. Incorporate more flour as needed to prevent the dough from sticking to you or the counter. Slice into the dough with a paring knife; if you see lots of air bubbles, keep kneading. The dough is kneaded when it forms a smooth elastic ball and has very few air bubbles when cut.

5. Rest the Pasta Dough: Clean and dry the mixing bowl. Place the ball of dough inside and cover with a dinner plate or plastic wrap. Rest for at least 30 minutes.

Note: At this point, the pasta dough can be refrigerated for up to 24 hours. Let it come back to room temperature before rolling.

6. Divide the Pasta Dough: Sprinkle a baking sheet generously with flour and scrape the ball of dough on top (it will stick to the bowl; use a spatula or bowl scraper if necessary). Divide the dough into four equal portions. Dust the portions with flour and cover with a clean dishtowel.

Note: The name of the game at this point is to keep everything well-floured to prevent the pasta from sticking to itself or the roller as you work. If the dough starts to feel sticky as you roll it, sprinkle it with flour. Also sprinkle flour on any pasta you’re not working (rolled, cut or otherwise) with and keep it covered with a dishtowel.

7. Begin Rolling Out the Pasta: Set your pasta machine to the thickest setting (usually marked “1”). Flatten one piece of dough into a thick disk between your hands and feed it through the pasta roller. Repeat once or twice. Fold this piece of dough into thirds, like folding a letter, and press it between your hands again. With the pasta machine still on the widest setting, feed the pasta crosswise between the rollers (see picture). Feed it through once or twice more until smooth. If desired, repeat this folding step. This helps to strengthen the gluten in the flour, giving it a chewier texture when cooked.

8. Thin the Pasta: Begin changing the settings on your roller to roll the pasta thinner and thinner. Roll the pasta two or three times at each setting, and don’t skip settings (the pasta tends to snag and warp if you do). If the pasta gets too long to be manageable, lay it on a cutting board and slice it in half. Roll the pasta as thin as you like to go. For linguine and fettuccine, I normally go to 6 or 7 on the KitchenAid attachement; for angel hair or stuffed pastas, I go one or two settings thinner.

9. Cut the Pasta: Cut the long stretch of dough into noodle-length sheets, usually about 12-inches. If making filled pasta or lasagna, proceed with shaping. If cutting into noodles, switch from the pasta roller to the noodle cutter, and run the sheet of pasta through the cutter. Toss the noodles with a little flour to keep them from sticking and gather them into a loose basket. Set this basket on the floured baking sheet and cover with a towel while you finish rolling and cutting the rest of the dough.

Note: I find it easiest to roll all the pasta at once before proceeding to cutting it into noodles. I sprinkle the sheets of pasta liberally with flour and overlap them on a floured baking sheet, covered with a towel.

10. Cooking, Drying, or Freezing the Pasta: To cook the pasta immediately, bring a large pot of water to a boil, salt the water, and cook the pasta until al dente, 4-5 minutes. To dry, lay the pasta over a clothes drying rack, coat hangers, or the back of a chair, and let air dry until completely brittle. Store in an airtight container for several weeks. To freeze, either freeze flat in long noodles or in the basket-shape on a baking sheet until completely frozen. Gather into an airtight container and freeze for up to three months. Dried and frozen noodles may need an extra minute or two to cook.

Additional Notes:

Pasta Dough in the Food Processor: Combine all the ingredients in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse until combined, then run the processor continuously until a dough is formed. Proceed with kneading and shaping the dough as directed.

Rolling and Cutting Pasta by Hand: It can be done! Divide the dough into four pieces and mimic the action of a pasta roller with a rolling pin. Roll as thin as possible, lifting and moving the dough constantly to make sure it doesn’t stick. Sprinkle the dough generously with flour and then gently roll it up. Use a very sharp chef knife to cut the roll cross-wise into equal-sized noodles. Shake out the coils, toss with flour, and proceed with cooking.

Green Sauce No. 4

Green Sauce No. 4

– via Bon Appétit

 

 Mixing lemon and lime juice, as well as a shot of apple cider vinegar, makes for a much more dynamic dressing than just one type of acid could ever achieve.

Ingredients:

MAKES ABOUT 1 CUP

  • 3 tablespoons white miso
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 teaspoons tahini
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon honey, preferably raw
  • 2 cups cilantro leaves with tender stems
  • ⅓ cup sliced chives
  • 1½ teaspoons grated peeled ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

Preparation:

 Pulse miso, lemon juice, lime juice, oil, tahini, vinegar, and honey in a food processor or a blender until miso is dissolved and mixture is smooth. Add cilantro, chives, ginger, and coriander and pulse until herbs are finely chopped; season with salt and pepper.

Do Ahead: Sauce can be made 3 days ahead. Cover and chill.

Recipe by Alaina Sullivan
Photograph by Alaina Sullivan

I posted both versions (same just drafted differently), Bon Appétit’s AND the original source; because I like how BA goes straight to point with recipe AND the OS’s words about it. ENJOY!

The Greenest Green Sauce That Goes on Everything

– via Bon Appétit

BY ALAINA SULLIVAN APRIL 19, 2017

If there’s one thing I do to make my life easier during the week, it’s make a sauce. I fix a small jar’s worth, stick it in the fridge, and rest easy knowing that I’ve got a dependable, phone-a-friend lifeline for after-work meals. A sauce breathes life into humble rice and perks up roasted vegetables. It complements rich meats, makes salads sing, and completes a grain bowl in one swoosh.

There are a million ways to make an herb sauce; this is the version I’ve got on speed dial right now. It’s basically a combination of the ingredients I reach for most often (miso, tahini, honey) blended together with herbs into a single condiment. The result is tangy, vibrant—I may go as far as to say it’s addictive. The flavor is complex, but the process isn’t. If you have 15 minutes and a food processor, you’re there. And it’s very forgiving. I only roughly measure, and I’d urge you to play around and make it your own.

Begin by washing some herbs: a small bunch of cilantro and/or parsley and a small bundle of chives. Don’t sweat exact amounts. Trim away the tough part of the stems and then toss the herbs right into your food processor. Next, grate a knob of ginger (about a 1″ piece) and add that. Squeeze in the juice of 1 lemon and 1 lime, and add 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar. Add 3 Tbsp. miso (I like either sweet white or chickpea miso), 2 Tbsp. olive oil, 2 Tbsp. tahini, and 1 Tbsp. raw honey.

I grind up some coriander seeds and throw that into the mix. Pulse it together (to help control the consistency), and pour in a little water to thin it if needed; it should be pourable but not too runny. Season with salt and pepper, taste, add a little more of whatever it needs, and then put it on everything.

 

2-Ingredient Slow Cooker BBQ Chicken | Gimme Some Oven

https://www.gimmesomeoven.com/slow-cooker-bbq-chicken-recipe/

Especially here in Arizona, when the heat is on & it’s just getting started. No oven after it hits 100°. 

.

.

AND IT’S ON!

Easy Appetizer – Slow Cooker Glazed Bacon Wrapped Sausage Bites

Easy Appetizer – Slow Cooker Glazed Bacon Wrapped Sausage Bites


My daughter made this recipe – from  Merry About Town & loved it. Well…now she has moved in with me (it’s a “village for Lily” thing) and made it for all of “us”. Everyone loves it. What’s not to love about pork on pork?
i 💓 🐷 🐖 ️ ✓
🐽 ️
Another reason to love it…it’s EASY, it’s easy and it’s easy  Did I say it’s easy? ️ 😆
 Ingredients

3 large links of pre-cooked sausage such as Kielbasa or Mennonite sausage (~1 1/2 pounds)
Raw Sliced bacon (~1/2 pack)
1 cup brown sugar
3 Tbsp grainy mustard
toothpicks

 Instructions

Cut sausage into rounds about 1 inch thick.
Cut bacon slices in half both ways so that you get 4 long thin pieces.
Wrap each piece of sausage with one of the 1/4 bacon pieces, secure with a toothpick and place in a regular size crockpot.
Continue until all your sausage is wrapped and in the crockpot.
Add brown sugar and mustard to the crockpot.
Gently stir so the sausage is covered with brown sugar and mustard (it will not be over all of it but you don’t want one big clump of sugar at the top).
Cover and cook on low for 6- 8 hours or on hight for 4 hours.
Pour in to a dish to serve or serve straight from the crockpot.

.”our” personally preferred bacon for this recipe 😀

.

.

.

.

.

.

Fettuccine Alfredo

Fettuccine Alfredo

fettuccine-alfredo
– from Bon Appétit

Real alfredo should never (never!) include cream; the silky sauce is the result of an emulsion between the grated cheese, melted butter, and starchy pasta water. This is part of BA’s Best, a collection of our essential recipes.

Ingredients:

12 ounces fettuccine or other long pasta
Kosher salt
¼ cup (½ stick) unsalted butter
¾ cup finely grated Parmesan, plus more for serving
Freshly ground black pepper

Preparation:
Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until very al dente. Drain, reserving 2 cups pasta cooking liquid.
Transfer 1 cup pasta cooking liquid to a large skillet. Bring to a gentle simmer, then whisk in butter, a piece at a time, until melted. Whisking constantly, gradually add cheese, making sure it’s completely melted and incorporated before adding more. Add pasta and toss to coat, adding more pasta cooking liquid as needed, until sauce blankets noodles completely. Serve topped with pepper and more cheese.

Recipe by Carla Lalli Music
Photograph by Michael Graydon & Nikole Herriott

Sheet Pan Balsamic Steak & Potatoes

– courtesy of Delish

– by LINDSAY FUNSTON


https://youtu.be/dshcXJ_bV34

Sometimes all you really need is steak & potatoes.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 lb. baby potatoes
  • kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tbsp. olive oil
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • Chopped fresh rosemary, plus sprigs
  • 1 lb. flank steak

DIRECTIONS

  1. In a large pot of salted boiling water, boil potatoes until tender, 12 minutes. Drain.
  2. Heat broiler. Transfer potatoes to a large rimmed baking sheet and toss with 2 tablespoons olive oil, garlic, and rosemary.
  3. On a plate, rub steak with oil and lemon juice and season generously with salt and pepper. Nestle in the middle of the potatoes.
  4. Broil until steak is medium, 4 minutes per side.
  5. Let rest, then slice and serve.

Classic Italian Gremolata

How To Make Classic Italian Gremolata

2120

courtesy of the Kitchn ~  
(followed with a link to Mario Batalli post on ways of use)

I’m so late to this game! But…better late than never. I’m jumping on this wagon.


Gremolata is one of those things where the whole is definitely greater than the sum of its parts. After all, what could be be more common in a kitchen than garlic, lemon, parsley? And yet this Italian condiment, which simply consists of those three items finely chopped together, is your secret ingredient. Sprinkled over any number of dishes, it will make every mouthful pop with its bright, fresh flavors. Gremolata is so simple that you barely need a recipe, but here’s one all the same, just to get you started.

Part condiment and part garnish, gremolata is most commonly used for a final flourish of flavor, classically with the famous Italian recipe Osso Buco, where it adds a fresh, zippy note to the rich, meaty dish. But it should not be limited to just rich preparations! Try it sprinkled over grilled or roasted vegetables, any baked or grilled fish, chicken, or lamb. Asparagus is particularly wonderful with gremolata, as well as many pasta dishes. And creamy bean dishes, especially if they contain meat, are sure to benefit from a last minute sprinkling of gremolata.

Gremolata is a favorite condiment in my household because it solves a major culinary challenge: how to add the bright, citrusy notes of lemon to green vegetable dishes without dulling the color. Have you ever had that happen? You add a dash of lemon to some asparagus only to have it turn a dull, army green. Ugh. Gremolata is your solution as it adds lemon in the form of zest which won’t react as much to green vegetables.


The Ingredients

Garlic

Since the garlic is raw, you want it as fresh as possible. Old garlic will be yellow and sticky, often with a green shoot growing out, and it will smell strongly and slightly acrid. Fresh garlic will be white, plump, and while its scent will be unmistakably garlicky, it will still smell fresh. If you only have older garlic, remove the green stem and blanch it for a few minutes in boiling water to remove some of the acrid taste.

Lemon

Use organic if at all possible, since you will only be using the zest. (The zest-free lemon will keep a few days which leaves you plenty of time to do something with the juice.) The lemon zest adds acid, zippiness, brightness.

Parsley

Use flat leaf parsley if available, and wash it well. Most importantly, be sure it is completely dry before you start chopping it. If possible wash and dry it a few hours before you use it and then wrap it in a towel to absorb the last few drops of water. If the stems are thin and subtle, don’t worry to much about including them. If the stems are thick and tough, you’ll want to pluck the leaves. Chop the parsley as finely as possible. Parsley adds a clean, fresh, herbal note.

The Equipment

Microplane

Gremolata is an excellent reason to go ahead and get yourself a Microplane grater, if you haven’t already. You can find them for about $10 these days and they are well worth it. The Microplane will finely mince the garlic in about 5 seconds. Having the garlic finely minced is critical to a good gremolata, so if you don’t have a Microplane, be sure to chop it as finely as possible. A microplance also is excellent for zesting the lemon as it easily removes just the yellow zest without any of the bitter pith and creates a very finely zested peel.

Chef’s knife

Be sure your knife is as sharp as possible so when your mincing the parsley, you’re making clean cuts through the leaves and not just smashing them with a dull knife blade.

What about a food processor?

Sure you can use one, but I find that they don’t chop things as finely or as evenly as I like. The amounts here aren’t that big, so a mini-chopper might work, although I don’t have any direct experience with this.

The Method

I like to chop my parsley until it is just shy of being finely minced. Then I grate the garlic and lemon over the parsley and finish the chopping while integrating the lemon and garlic into the mix. I like this better than just tossing the separately chopped items as I feel it helps to blend the flavors.

Also, I like a very finely chopped gremolata as a general rule, but sometimes a more rustic texture is called for. In that case, still grate the garlic and lemon peel but don’t chop the parsley as finely.

Substituting Other Ingredients

Parsley, garlic, and lemon make up the classic gremolata, but you can certainly switch things up to suit your dish. The garlic can be replaced with shallots, for instance, or the lemon with another citrus such as lime. Consider a mandarin orange and mint version, for example, or cilantro, lime and shallot. Or mix in a few fresh herbs with the parsley, such as adding a bit of tarragon to the classic mixture.

How To Make Gremolata

Makes about 1/3 cup

What You Need

Ingredients
1 small bunch of parsley, washed and dried (enough to make 1 cup loosely-packed)
1 clove garlic, papery skin removed
2 organic lemons, washed and dried

Equipment
Sharp chef’s knife
Cutting board
Microplane

Instructions

  1. Prep the parsley: Remove the leaves from the parsley — enough to make 1 cup when very loosely packed.
  2. Chop the parsley: Chop the parsley with a chef’s knife until it is nearly finely chopped. It should be less than 1/2 cup.
  3. Add the garlic: Using a Microplane or fine-toothed grater, grate the garlic clove over the parsley.
  4. Add the lemon: Using the same grater (don’t bother to wash it), grate just the zest from the two lemons on top of the garlic. 

    → Bonus:
     Doing the garlic and lemon in this order will help to rid the Microplane of garlic odors!
  5. Finish the chopping: Continue to chop the parsley, mixing in the garlic and lemon as you go, until the parsley is chopped very fine.
  6. Use or store: Use the gremolata right away or store it in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to one day

5 WAYS TO USE GREMOLATA

 Mario Batalli 

IT’S NOT JUST FOR BRAISED MEATS!

2120
Gremolata ~ photo from Whole Foods

CITRUS CAPRESE

CITRUS CAPRESE

citrus-caprese

CITRUS CAPRESE
– from the Queen Creek Olive Mill

INGREDIENTS

1 Arizona navel orange

1 Arizona pink grapefruit

Fresh Mozzarella

Queen Creek Olive Mill Fig Balsamic Reduction

Queen Creek Olive Mill Robust Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Fresh basil leaves

Sea salt

INSTRUCTIONS:

This is a perfect recipe for the Arizona citrus season. Use your fresh, seasonal oranges and grapefruits for a healthy and delicious antipasti salad.

Peel orange and grapefruit, slice against the sections. Slice fresh Mozzarella. Arrange on plate by alternating orange and Mozzarella then grapefruit and Mozzarella slices. Drizzle with Fig Balsamic Reduction and finish with Robust EVOO. Garnish with basil leaves and sprinkle with salt.

2017-01-13-13-14-30

Products Used:
Fig Balsamic Reduction, Robust EVOO

fig_balsamic-1
RELATED PRODUCTS

FIG BALSAMIC REDUCTION

Fresh Mountain figs are reduced then added to our barrel aged balsamic. Whether drizzled lovingly on red ripe heirloom tomatoes, marinating a fine filet mignon, or served over fresh berries and ice cream, this versatile reduction syrup is sure to make any meal delightful!

Ingredients: Balsamic vinegar, Grape must, Organic fig puree
Sizes: 250ml
Gluten Free, Vegan, Contains naturally occurring sulfites, Arizona Made with Balsamic vinegar from Modena, Italy

Another awesome recommendation :

wpid-fig+harvest.jpeg.jpeg

CARAMELIZED RED ONION & FIG TAPENADE

caramelized_tap_overhead

Their tapenade is a unique combination of flavor. Savory, yet subtly sweet! We simmer the freshest sweet red onions and figs in Italian balsamic vinegar with a touch of port to create this unique recipe.

Ingredients: Red onions, Water, Raisins, Figs, Olive oil, Balsamic vinegar, Salt, Lemon juice, & Spices.
Sizes: 9oz
Gluten Free, Vegan, Kosher, Made in the USA

wpid-wpid-2012-10-18-figpreserves1.jpeg

.

348s-1

.

348s-2

.

o-2

Speaking of #figs and #balsamic. ..

b089c234bdc099378b1b5836f4a5c2a0

BAMM! BULLSEYE 😀

tumblr_nlk5698zrj1ta7jgzo1_250-1

 

Italian Sausage with Grapes and Balsamic Vinegar

Italian Sausage with Grapes and Balsamic Vinegar

img_6976

Italian Sausage with Grapes and Balsamic Vinegar

wp-1483903476828.jpg
Photo courtesy of Cook’s Illustrated

– adapted from America’s Test Kitchen

*I was intrigued, tried it, LOVED it. I do believe in using the best quality ingredients you can get. Once you try the right (the good stuff) balsamic…it’s game over. DELICIOUS!  BTW, my enamel cast iron skillet/pot/casserole worked excellent! AND now that I made it, I know I will again but not be afraid 😀 Now I’ll have a better grasp of how high to have the heat, amounts of ingredients, etc..

picsart_01-09-04.47.25.jpg

Why This Recipe Works
Italian sausage with grapes is a great example of the affinity that pork and fruit flavors have for one another. We wanted to pay homage to this simple Italian dish and highlight the attributes that make it so appealing. Taking inspiration from a potsticker cooking method, we use a combination of sautéing and steaming to produce sausages that are nicely browned but moist and juicy. Building the sauce in the same skillet, we cook down seedless red grapes and thinly sliced onion until caramelized to create a sweet but complex sauce. White wine, in addition to balsamic vinegar, lends the dish acidity and complements the grapes. Oregano and pepper contribute earthiness and a touch of spice, while a finish of fresh mint adds brightness.
*NOTE FROM THE TEST KITCHEN Our favorite supermarket balsamic vinegar is Bertolli Balsamic Vinegar of Modena. Serve this dish with crusty bread and salad for a heartier meal.

Ingredients:

1 tbs vegetable oil
1 ½ lbs sweet Italian sausage
1 lb seedless red grapes, halved lengthwise (3 cups)
1 onion, halved and sliced thin
¼ cup water
¼ tsp pepper
⅛ tsp salt
¼ cup dry white wine
1 tbs chopped fresh oregano
2 tsps balsamic vinegar
2 tbs chopped fresh mint

Instructions

* 1. Heat oil in 12-inch skillet over medium heat until shimmering. Arrange sausages in pan and cook, turning once, until browned on 2 sides, about 5 minutes. Tilt skillet and carefully remove excess fat with paper towel.

picsart_01-09-04.31.19.jpg

.

picsart_01-09-04.31.47.jpg

Distribute grapes and onion over and around sausages.

picsart_01-09-04.52.43.jpg

.

picsart_01-09-04.49.59.jpg

.

landing-16x9_sfs_italian_sausage_grapes_balsamic_vinegar-29
Photo courtesy of Cook’s Illustrated

 

Add water and immediately cover. Cook, turning sausages once, until they register between 160 and 165 degrees and onions and grapes have softened, about 10 minutes.

picsart_01-09-04.48.45.jpg

.

picsart_01-09-04.50.17.jpg

* 2. Transfer sausages to paper towel–lined plate and tent with aluminum foil. Return skillet to medium-high heat and stir pepper and salt into grape-onion mixture. Spread grape-onion mixture in even layer in skillet and cook without stirring until browned, 3 to 5 minutes. Stir and continue to cook, stirring frequently, until mixture is well browned and grapes are soft but still retain their shape, 3 to 5 minutes longer. Reduce heat to medium, stir in wine and oregano, and cook, scraping up any browned bits, until wine is reduced by half, 30 to 60 seconds. Remove pan from heat and stir in vinegar.

picsart_01-09-04.52.08.jpg

wpid-picsart_1431280396586

* 3. Arrange sausages on serving platter and spoon grape-onion mixture over top. Sprinkle with mint and serve.

picsart_01-09-04.29.31.jpg

 

The Right Way to Cook Sausage

SAUTÉ AND THEN STEAM

Moderate heat develops flavorful browning without burning. Then, adding a little water to the pan and covering it gently steams the sausages so they cook up juicy.

The point of this recipe is to cook sausage so that it is done (160°-165°), with good color and FLAVOR, but not burst/split open. And it worked…was great!

picsart_01-09-04.45.16.jpg

.

picsart_01-09-04.53.54.jpg

.

gammaaceti

.dsc_0001

.

picsart_01-09-04.30.07.jpg

.

picsart_01-09-04.30.56.jpg

.

img_6976

.

14dff93da7cffa079047c0077c80d2e5

 

 

Slow Cooker Cabbage, Sausage and Potatoes 


Slow Cooker Cabbage, Sausage and Potatoes 

Great for a cold day or night. Easy delicious comfort food. 

😀

INGREDIENTS

  • 1½ lbs potatoes, quartered 
  • 2 packages kielbasa, smoked sausage, unsmoked- sliced
  • 1 small head of cabbage (or 6 cups)- chopped
  • 4 cups stock (chicken, vegetable or ham)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 Bay Leaf
  • Pssst….I did sprinkle a little brown sugar in there 😉

My daughter adds carrots & loves it. Flexible recipe for sure 😀 

And

I layered, starting with potatoes & onion 

INSTRUCTIONS 

  1. Place all the ingredients in a6 quart slow cooker
  2. Cook on low for 6-8 hours




.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Extra pics; to get them off my phone and well..I like pictures of food LOL-samu-chan.gif

And I’ve upped the amount of sausage.

20170220_133047

.

20170220_133454-1

.

20170220_134304

.

20170220_134322

.

20170220_135258

.

20170220_135501

.

20170220_135526

.

20170220_140110

.

20170220_135943

.

20170220_135702

.

20170220_140226

.

20170220_140241

.

20170220_140236

.

20170220_140308